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Plagiarism: Home

Welcome

Welcome to the Plagiarism LibGuide. This guide is to help students better understand plagiarism. Please take some time to explore the information contained therein. If you require assistance, please contact Mr. Underwood the Distance Education Librarian (junderwood@tuskegee.edu). If you need in-depth research assistance, please make an appointment with one of the Reference Librarians. Reference Desk 334-727-8896 or Mr. Underwood 334-727-8676 (junderwood@tuskegee.edu).

What is Plagiarism

According to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary, to "plagiarize" means

  • to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own
  • to use (another's production) without crediting the source
  • to commit literary theft
  • to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source

Source:  http://www.plagiarism.org/plagiarism-101/what-is-plagiarism

Some Ways to Prevent Plagiarism

  • Do not cut & paste information into your document without correctly citing the information
  • Inform the reader by using citations each time you write something you didn’t know before you started the paper
  • Use a note taking system that will allow you to organize your sources
  • Check the citations when you are finished writing
  • Don’t wait until the night before the paper is due to research or to write it

Source: Plagiarism - Ivy Tech Community College

Tools to Help Prevent Plagiarism

Overview and Contradictions

Summary:

There are few intellectual offenses more serious than plagiarism in academic and professional contexts. This resource offers advice on how to avoid plagiarism in your work.

 

Contributors:Karl Stolley, Allen Brizee, Joshua M. Paiz
Last Edited: 2014-10-10 09:01:36

Research-based writing in American institutions, both educational and corporate, is filled with rules that writers, particularly beginners, aren't aware of or don't know how to follow. Many of these rules have to do with research and proper citation. Gaining familiarity with these rules, however, is critically important, as inadvertent mistakes can lead to charges of plagiarism, which is the uncredited use (both intentional and unintentional) of somebody else's words or ideas.

While some rhetorical traditions may not insist so heavily on documenting sources of words, ideas, images, sounds, etc., American academic rhetorical tradition does. A charge of plagiarism can have severe consequences, including expulsion from a university or loss of a job, not to mention a writer's loss of credibility and professional standing. This resource, which does not reflect any official university policy, is designed to help you develop strategies for knowing how to avoid accidental plagiarism. For instructors seeking a key statement on definitions and avoidance on plagiarism, see Defining and Avoiding Plagiarism: The WPA Statement on Best Practices.

(Purdue University students will want to make sure that they are familiar with Purdue's official academic dishonesty policy as well as any additional policies that their instructors have implemented.)

Intellectual challenges in American academic writing

There are some intellectual challenges that all students are faced with when writing. Sometimes these challenges can almost seem like contradictions, particularly when addressing them within a single paper. For example, American teachers often instruct students to:

Develop a topic based on
what has already been said and written

BUT   

Write something
new and original

Rely on experts' and authorities' opinions

BUT    

Improve upon and/or disagree with those same opinions

Give credit to previous researchers

BUT  

Make your own significant    contribution

Improve your English to fit into a
discourse community by building upon what you hear and read

BUT  

Use your own words and your own voice

For instructor and student documents on preventing plagiarism, please
visit these resources on the Purdue OWL.

Source: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/01/

Quoting a Source and Paraphrasing

Quoting a Source

  • Be careful to quote the text exactly.
  • A direct quote must be included in quotations. 
  • Use ellipses (…) to show omitted text and brackets [   ] to show added phrases.
  • Quotes must mention the person’s name and be cited using the format specified by your instructor.

Paraphrasing

  • Paraphrasing is putting the author’s words into your own words.
  • Paraphrasing is not changing or deleting a couple of words in an author’s statement.
  • Paraphrases must mention the person’s name and be cited using the format specified by your instructor.

Paraphrasing Tips

  • Read the author’s paragraph and then look away while writing the concept in your own words and your own style.
  • Do not use a thesaurus to change the author’s words.
  • If you still recognize the author’s work, then you haven’t paraphrased.

Source: Plagiarism - Ivy Tech Community College

Tuskegee University Plagiarism Policy for Undergraduates

According to the Tuskegee University Academic Regulations and Procedures for Undergraduates, pg. 26:

Honesty in academics, as well as in other matters, is expected of everyone at Tuskegee University. It is the obligation of all to adhere to this standard. Individuals are not expected to cheat or be dishonest, not to create the appearance of being dishonest, and not to contribute to or condone the dishonesty of others. Dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism, forgery, or knowingly furnishing false information to officials of the University will not be tolerated. The penalty could include failure in the course and possible dismissal or suspension from the University

Tuskegee University Plagiarism Policy for Graduate Students

According to the Tuskegee University Graduate Handbook, pg. 19:

Honesty in academics, as well as in other matters, is expected of everyone at Tuskegee University. It is the obligation of all to adhere to this standard. Individuals are expected not to cheat or be dishonest, not to create the appearance of being dishonest, and not to contribute to or condone the dishonesty of others. Dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism, forgery and/or manipulation of data, misrepresentation of data or knowingly furnishing false information to an official of the University will not be tolerated. The penalty could include failure in the course, invalidation of thesis/dissertation results and possible suspension or dismissal from the University.

Plagiarism Justification and Defense

The Wall Street Journal

‘My Little Pony’ Rides to the Rescue in Melania Trump Plagiarism Defense

Quote - 
"Twilight Sparkle from 'My Little Pony' said, ‘This is your dream. Anything you can do in your dreams, you can do now.'"  -- Sean Spicer, the RNC chief strategist, noting to CNN's Wolf Blitzer the similarity of that "My Little Pony" line and Melania Trump's speech, attempting to dismiss criticism.

Source: https://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2016/07/19/my-little-pony-rides-to-the-rescue-in-melania-trump-plagiarism-defense/

Current Plagiarism Example